An Attitude of Gratitude & Trusted Food: Serious Food Allergies at Thanksgiving

Nov 16, 2017 | News

Below are a few Thanksgiving tips and suggestions for people with serious food allergies. If you have any questions, you should always consult with your healthcare provider.

Thanksgiving can be great, but since “Turkey Day” tends to revolve around food, it can also be a challenge for those with serious food allergies.

Thanksgiving often involves big meals with family, friends, distant relatives, acquaintances, and even total strangers. Social dynamics can crank up pressure to eat all the food that is served. Are you worried you’ll offend someone if you turn down food? Do others tend to downplay the seriousness of your allergies?

ALWAYS be prepared for severe allergic reactions (Type I, including anaphylaxis), by carrying your epinephrine auto-injector with you. Emergencies do happen, even with the best of planning. If you notice a sign of this type of potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, use your epinephrine auto-injector as soon as possible, and then call 911.

Of course, we believe it’s better to prevent reactions than to have to treat them! Below are some Thanksgiving tips.

First of all, don’t be afraid to ask: “what’s in the stuffing?” When eating with a group, it’s better to be honest about having a serious food allergy and needing to eat a restricted diet. If you try to cover it up, your risk of anaphylaxis might increase. We believe your friends, family, and loved ones will understand – especially if you communicate the severity of the issue to them, educate them about your allergies, and remind them of your allergies before gatherings.

Thanksgiving foods often include the top 8 food allergens, namely, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, milk, wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. These “top 8” are often found in Thanksgiving favorites, including stuffing, potatoes, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, veggies, and sometimes the turkey itself. [ACAAI]One sensible piece of advice: “When in Doubt, Leave it Out!” Why risk a serious allergic reaction over a food you’re not quite sure about? And if you’re cooking for someone who has food allergies and you have doubt about an ingredient, you’ll probably want to leave it out as well.

If you’re hosting and preparing food, one strategy is to seek recipe variations that don’t include the allergen. You can search online for recipes that do not have the allergen – for example, searching for “nut-free dessert recipes.” Another good idea? Asking guests who bring food to also bring an index card that lists the ingredients – and then attaching the card to the dish.

If you’re a guest at a party, and you have a serious food allergy, you may wish to talk privately with the host to make sure the meal goes off without a hitch. Also consider emailing the other guests, if you feel comfortable doing so. Another good plan: quietly pack backup food, in case you don’t feel completely confident about your food safety at the party.

Of course, some people with food allergies are so highly-sensitive that even being in the same room with their allergen(s) can trigger a severe allergic reaction requiring an epinephrine auto-injector. If you know such a highly-sensitive allergic person… or if you ARE such a highly-sensitive allergic person…. or if you are the PARENT of such a highly-sensitive allergic person… then communication with all involved is key to help come up with a practical plan to keep everyone safe.

The bottom line for people with serious food allergies requiring epinephrine auto-injection: Always be prepared. Feel free to ask about ingredients in the food… don’t think twice about preparing or bringing your own food… don’t feel self-conscious about hurting anyone’s feelings, because your health and safety are the most important factors of all… and carry your epinephrine auto-injector at all times!

Sources:

Epinephrine for First-aid Management of Anaphylaxis,” Sicherer et al, American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Food Allergy,” American College of Asthma, Allergy, & Immunology (ACAAI)

Thanksgiving Holiday Stuffed With Allergy, Asthma Triggers,” American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology (ACAAI)

Links to external websites are provided for your convenience, and should not be viewed as an endorsement of Impax Laboratories or its products.  Impax has no control over the content on these websites.

PP-PAT-EAI-US-0006  11/2017

What are Serious Food Allergies?

Serious food allergies means having severe allergic reactions to certain foods, which may include nuts, milk, eggs, soy, and/or other foods. A potentially life-threatening allergic reaction is called anaphylaxis. At the first sign of anaphylaxis epinephrine is the recommended first step at treating it, followed by immediate medical attention. Being prepared for anaphylaxis means having access to an epinephrine auto-injector.”

An Attitude of Gratitude & Trusted Food: Serious Food Allergies at Thanksgiving

Nov 16, 2017 | News

What are Serious Food Allergies?

Serious food allergies means having severe allergic reactions to certain foods, which may include nuts, milk, eggs, soy, and/or other foods. A potentially life-threatening allergic reaction is called anaphylaxis. At the first sign of anaphylaxis epinephrine is the recommended first step at treating it, followed by immediate medical attention. Being prepared for anaphylaxis means having access to an epinephrine auto-injector.”

Below are a few Thanksgiving tips and suggestions for people with serious food allergies. If you have any questions, you should always consult with your healthcare provider.

Thanksgiving can be great, but since “Turkey Day” tends to revolve around food, it can also be a challenge for those with serious food allergies.

Thanksgiving often involves big meals with family, friends, distant relatives, acquaintances, and even total strangers. Social dynamics can crank up pressure to eat all the food that is served. Are you worried you’ll offend someone if you turn down food? Do others tend to downplay the seriousness of your allergies?

ALWAYS be prepared for severe allergic reactions (Type I, including anaphylaxis), by carrying your epinephrine auto-injector with you. Emergencies do happen, even with the best of planning. If you notice a sign of this type of potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, use your epinephrine auto-injector as soon as possible, and then call 911.

Of course, we believe it’s better to prevent reactions than to have to treat them! Below are some Thanksgiving tips.

First of all, don’t be afraid to ask: “what’s in the stuffing?” When eating with a group, it’s better to be honest about having a serious food allergy and needing to eat a restricted diet. If you try to cover it up, your risk of anaphylaxis might increase. We believe your friends, family, and loved ones will understand – especially if you communicate the severity of the issue to them, educate them about your allergies, and remind them of your allergies before gatherings.

Thanksgiving foods often include the top 8 food allergens, namely, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, milk, wheat, soy, fish, and shellfish. These “top 8” are often found in Thanksgiving favorites, including stuffing, potatoes, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, veggies, and sometimes the turkey itself. [ACAAI]One sensible piece of advice: “When in Doubt, Leave it Out!” Why risk a serious allergic reaction over a food you’re not quite sure about? And if you’re cooking for someone who has food allergies and you have doubt about an ingredient, you’ll probably want to leave it out as well.

If you’re hosting and preparing food, one strategy is to seek recipe variations that don’t include the allergen. You can search online for recipes that do not have the allergen – for example, searching for “nut-free dessert recipes.” Another good idea? Asking guests who bring food to also bring an index card that lists the ingredients – and then attaching the card to the dish.

If you’re a guest at a party, and you have a serious food allergy, you may wish to talk privately with the host to make sure the meal goes off without a hitch. Also consider emailing the other guests, if you feel comfortable doing so. Another good plan: quietly pack backup food, in case you don’t feel completely confident about your food safety at the party.

Of course, some people with food allergies are so highly-sensitive that even being in the same room with their allergen(s) can trigger a severe allergic reaction requiring an epinephrine auto-injector. If you know such a highly-sensitive allergic person… or if you ARE such a highly-sensitive allergic person…. or if you are the PARENT of such a highly-sensitive allergic person… then communication with all involved is key to help come up with a practical plan to keep everyone safe.

The bottom line for people with serious food allergies requiring epinephrine auto-injection: Always be prepared. Feel free to ask about ingredients in the food… don’t think twice about preparing or bringing your own food… don’t feel self-conscious about hurting anyone’s feelings, because your health and safety are the most important factors of all… and carry your epinephrine auto-injector at all times!

Sources:

Epinephrine for First-aid Management of Anaphylaxis,” Sicherer et al, American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Food Allergy,” American College of Asthma, Allergy, & Immunology (ACAAI)

Thanksgiving Holiday Stuffed With Allergy, Asthma Triggers,” American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology (ACAAI)

Links to external websites are provided for your convenience, and should not be viewed as an endorsement of Impax Laboratories or its products.  Impax has no control over the content on these websites.

PP-PAT-EAI-US-0006

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector?


  1. Epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector contains epinephrine, a medicine used to treat allergic emergencies (anaphylaxis). Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening, can happen within minutes, and can be caused by stinging and biting insects, allergy injections, foods, medicines, exercise or other unknown causes. Symptoms of an anaphylaxis may include:
    • trouble breathing
    • wheezing
    • hoarseness (changes in the way your voice sounds)
    • hives (raised reddened rash that may itch)
    • severe itching
    • swelling of your face, lips, mouth, or tongue
    • skin rash, redness, or swelling
    • fast heartbeat
    • weak pulse
    • feeling very anxious
    • confusion
    • stomach pain
    • losing control of urine or bowel movements (incontinence)
    • diarrhea or stomach cramps
    • dizziness, fainting, or “passing out” (unconsciousness).
  2. Always carry your epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector with you because you may not know when anaphylaxis may happen. Talk to your healthcare provider if you need additional units to keep at work, school, or other locations. Tell your family members, caregivers, and others where you keep your epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector and how to use it before you need it. You may be unable to speak in an allergic emergency.
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