Need Epinephrine for Severe Allergies? Make Your Insurance Work Harder For You!

Dec 22, 2017 | News

Below are a few tips and suggestions for making the most of your medical insurance. If you have any questions about health issues, you should always consult with your healthcare provider.

The end of the calendar year is upon us. That means many patients have met their annual out-of-pocket medical insurance deductible, activating their full coverage. But medical insurance limits and deductibles will reset in the new year.

If you or your child requires epinephrine for severe allergies, now may be the perfect time to stock up! If you’ve achieved full coverage, the year’s-end is a great time to take advantage of it. Always review your specific insurance plan and contact your insurance provider with any questions. Also, it’s a great time to check your devices’ expiration dates in case they need a refill.

What are Serious Allergies?

Serious food allergies means having severe allergic reactions to certain foods, which may include nuts, milk, eggs, soy, and/or other foods. A potentially life-threatening allergic reaction is called anaphylaxis. At the first sign of anaphylaxis epinephrine is the recommended first step at treating it, followed by immediate medical attention. Being prepared for anaphylaxis means having access to an epinephrine auto-injector.

What’s A Deductible?

A “deductible” is the money your insurance plan requires you to pay out-of-pocket before it covers all or part of your healthcare services. Deductibles are becoming more common and more expensive. Consumers often spend $1000 out-of-pocket to meet the deductible. Your insurance plan may (or may not) count both physician costs and prescription costs toward your deductible.

Now may be the time to stock up on the epinephrine auto-injectors you need. Be prepared!

  • Keep your epinephrine auto-injector with you
    No matter how careful you are, allergic emergencies (Type I, including anaphylaxis) can happen. Use your auto-injector at the first sign of a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction – then call 911.
    .
  • It’s smart to store devices in handy places
    You might want to store epinephrine auto-injectors at your office, school, and friends’ and family’s homes – everywhere you frequently go. Do not store them in the car, though, because heat or cold can damage the medicine.
    .
  • Shelf life and expiration dates
    The epinephrine auto-injector has an expiration date, so it’s a good idea to check your devices’ expiration dates. Now could be a great time to restock!
    .
  • Single-use only
    Most types of epinephrine auto-injectors only dispense one dose of medicine – they’re not reusable. That’s another reason it’s great to have extra supplies on hand. Need instructions on how to use your medicine? Check the medicine’s or manufacturer’s official website for directions.
    .
  • New Year’s Resolution
    The New Year’s season is a built-in reminder for optimizing your health… for example, refill your prescription, talk to your doctor, and revisit your allergy-management routines. Now is the perfect time to take care of you!

The end of the year may be a great time to use the insurance benefits you’ve earned throughout the year to stock up on epinephrine auto-injectors. Remember, your health is always of paramount importance! Be prepared.

Sources:

Epinephrine for First-aid Management of Anaphylaxis,” Sicherer et al, American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Food Allergy,” American College of Asthma, Allergy, & Immunology (ACAAI)

Latex Allergy,” American College of Asthma, Allergy, & Immunology (ACAAI)

PP-PAT-EAI-US-0008  12/2017

Need Epinephrine for Severe Allergies? Make Your Insurance Work Harder For You!

Dec 22, 2017 | News

Below are a few tips and suggestions for making the most of your medical insurance. If you have any questions about health issues, you should always consult with your healthcare provider.

The end of the calendar year is upon us. That means many patients have met their annual out-of-pocket medical insurance deductible, activating their full coverage. But medical insurance limits and deductibles will reset in the new year.

If you or your child requires epinephrine for severe allergies, now may be the perfect time to stock up! If you’ve achieved full coverage, the year’s-end is a great time to take advantage of it. Always review your specific insurance plan and contact your insurance provider with any questions. Also, it’s a great time to check your devices’ expiration dates in case they need a refill.

What are Serious Allergies?

Serious food allergies means having severe allergic reactions to certain foods, which may include nuts, milk, eggs, soy, and/or other foods. A potentially life-threatening allergic reaction is called anaphylaxis. At the first sign of anaphylaxis epinephrine is the recommended first step at treating it, followed by immediate medical attention. Being prepared for anaphylaxis means having access to an epinephrine auto-injector.

What’s A Deductible?

A “deductible” is the money your insurance plan requires you to pay out-of-pocket before it covers all or part of your healthcare services. Deductibles are becoming more common and more expensive. Consumers often spend $1000 out-of-pocket to meet the deductible. Your insurance plan may (or may not) count both physician costs and prescription costs toward your deductible.

Now may be the time to stock up on the epinephrine auto-injectors you need. Be prepared!

  • Keep your epinephrine auto-injector with you
    No matter how careful you are, allergic emergencies (Type I, including anaphylaxis) can happen. Use your auto-injector at the first sign of a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction – then call 911.
    .
  • It’s smart to store devices in handy places
    You might want to store epinephrine auto-injectors at your office, school, and friends’ and family’s homes – everywhere you frequently go. Do not store them in the car, though, because heat or cold can damage the medicine.
    .
  • Shelf life and expiration dates
    The epinephrine auto-injector has an expiration date, so it’s a good idea to check your devices’ expiration dates. Now could be a great time to restock!
    .
  • Single-use only
    Most types of epinephrine auto-injectors only dispense one dose of medicine – they’re not reusable. That’s another reason it’s great to have extra supplies on hand. Need instructions on how to use your medicine? Check the medicine’s or manufacturer’s official website for directions.
    .
  • New Year’s Resolution
    The New Year’s season is a built-in reminder for optimizing your health… for example, refill your prescription, talk to your doctor, and revisit your allergy-management routines. Now is the perfect time to take care of you!

The end of the year may be a great time to use the insurance benefits you’ve earned throughout the year to stock up on epinephrine auto-injectors. Remember, your health is always of paramount importance! Be prepared.

Sources:

Epinephrine for First-aid Management of Anaphylaxis,” Sicherer et al, American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

Food Allergy,” American College of Asthma, Allergy, & Immunology (ACAAI)

Latex Allergy,” American College of Asthma, Allergy, & Immunology (ACAAI)

PP-PAT-EAI-US-0008  12/2017

Important Safety Information

What is the most important information I should know about epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector?


  1. Epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector contains epinephrine, a medicine used to treat allergic emergencies (anaphylaxis). Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening, can happen within minutes, and can be caused by stinging and biting insects, allergy injections, foods, medicines, exercise or other unknown causes. Symptoms of an anaphylaxis may include:
    • trouble breathing
    • wheezing
    • hoarseness (changes in the way your voice sounds)
    • hives (raised reddened rash that may itch)
    • severe itching
    • swelling of your face, lips, mouth, or tongue
    • skin rash, redness, or swelling
    • fast heartbeat
    • weak pulse
    • feeling very anxious
    • confusion
    • stomach pain
    • losing control of urine or bowel movements (incontinence)
    • diarrhea or stomach cramps
    • dizziness, fainting, or “passing out” (unconsciousness).
  2. Always carry your epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector with you because you may not know when anaphylaxis may happen. Talk to your healthcare provider if you need additional units to keep at work, school, or other locations. Tell your family members, caregivers, and others where you keep your epinephrine injection, USP auto-injector and how to use it before you need it. You may be unable to speak in an allergic emergency.
  3. Read More












Share